Tag: non GIS

Dennis Ritchie dies.

Posted by – Thursday 2011-10-13

Rob Pike reports, via its Google+, that Dennis Ritchie died last weekend.

Dennis Ritchie (standing) at a PDP-11

Dennis Ritchie (standing) and Ken Thompson at a PDP-11, 1972
picture courtesy of Bell Labs

Dennis Ritchie is gone, the contributions he made to the computing world – UNIX, the C programming language – will last forever. On ZDNet.com, Rupert Goodwins writes:

“While the introduction of Intel’s 4004 microprocessor in 1971 is widely regarded as a key moment in modern computing, the contemporaneous birth of the C programming language is less well known. Yet the creation of C has as much claim, if not more, to be the true seminal moment of IT as we know it; it sits at the heart of programming — and in the hearts of programmers — as the quintessential expression of coding elegance, power, simplicity and portability.”

“Unix and C’s direct and spiritual descendants cannot be counted, but include Linux, Android, Mac OS, iOS, JavaScript, C++, the genius of the internet and a world full of developers.”

black ribbon

Requiescat in pace
, dmr.

Die, IE6, die: the IE6 countdown.

Posted by – Monday 2011-03-07

Once upon a time, after the first web browsers war, Microsoft’s Internet Explorer 6 (IE6) was the king of the web browsers. IE6 was the most used one, given not only its technical merits but also the dominance of Microsoft on the desktop operating system arena and its anticompetitive practices.

Bill Gates, the United States v. Microsoft trial

Bill Gates, USA v. Microsoft Trial (picture taken from Wikipedia.org)

IE6, as well as IE5, was a pain for web developers – like me – because of its many and intentional incompatibilities. The additional work needed to make a website viewable with IE6 was error prone, frustrating and time consuming.

The first IE6 beta version was realeased in March 2001. About 51 months later, the first beta of the next major version was released. Meanwhile, IE6 also became obsolete: for instance, other web browsers like Firefox, Opera or Safari featured tabbed browsing or full support for PNG format images, while IE6 didn’t.

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